Territorial Women's Memorial Rose Garden
RACHEL CATHARINE MARIA WIEBRECHT MILLER

Rachel was born in Behrenwalde, Germany, on April 6, 1859, the daughter of Dorothea Elizabeth Fund and Johan Carl Wiebrecht.

She married Leroy Daniel "Roll" Miller on April 30, 1876, in Paris, Illinois. The following description of her wedding and arrival in Arizona is from Echoes of the Past II: "She was 17 years old and wore a light dove-colored basque dress. A high collar fastened in back with a large bow of ribbon, which was a little darker shade than the dress. The streamers attached to the bow went down past the waist of the dress. The waist was made of folds that draped, and the skirt was ankle length. She wore high-topped lace shoes.

"In her hair was a wreath of tiny pink rosebuds... Roll had the rings made in California from Arizona gold from Lynx Creek. The engagement ring was a puzzle ring. It was designed so that hands clasped on a gold band and when pressed in a certain place the hands came apart. The wedding ring was a gold band with two hearts slightly overlapping with radiating lines going out from the hearts.

"The Millers came by train to Oakland, California, and then by boat to San Pedro. At Los Angeles, they took the train to Indian Wells, California, and then a stage, drawn by six horses, to Tucson, and continued on through to Wickenburg, arriving about midnight July 12, 1876, in Skull Valley."

Rachel and Roll had seven children: Esta Redden (1877), Frederic S., Serilda (1888), Dora (Mrs. Herbert) Cook, Thomas H., Harley (1881), and Charlie, who died in 1950. She also raised her two grandchildren, Rachel and Esta Redden. She was widowed in 1892 but continued to manage the family ranch herself.

Rachel was admired for the brave way she carried on and was a loyal, proud and independent mother. She never seemed old, and always liked to be with young people. She believed in Christian Science and was a member of Rebekah Lodge.

Rachel's daughter, Esta Redden, and her granddaughter, Rachel Koontz, are also represented in the Rose Garden. Called "Aunt Rachel" by many, she died on November 20, 1954, of a stroke and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery.

Donors: Her family



Additional documentation and photographs may be available in the Sharlot Hall Museum Archives and Library.