Territorial Women's Memorial Rose Garden
HARRIET ELIZA SANDERSON DEMING
Harriet Eliza Sanderson was born in 1872, daughter of Captain and Mrs. Sanderson. Harriet and her brother Will were orphaned at an early age and reared by maternal relatives in New England.

Prior to 1892, she married Reverend Clyde Washington Deming in Massachusetts. They moved about frequently in the New England area, which was typical
of Methodist ministers in those days.

Harriet and Clyde had five children: Rowena Flick, John Miley, Clyde William, Adelbert Douglas and Clark Sanderson Deming.

Harriet suffered from sinusitis and her doctors recommended a move to a drier climate. In 1906, the family moved to Douglas, Arizona, where Clyde had secured an appointment with the local Methodist Church.

Three years later they moved to Prescott, where Clyde became minister of the church on Marina Street. In 1910, they homesteaded 160 acres in the Granite Dells area on which five generations of Demings would live and are still living.

Harriet was an active and model minister's wife, entertaining visiting church officials, hosting sewing groups, and teaching Bible study classes in addition to raising their five children.

Their ministry took them to Jerome, Kingman and Needles, California. But they
returned to Prescott as often as they could for visits to their Granite Dells ranch.

In 1918, Clyde suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed on his right side and with some speech loss. Deciding to remain in the lower altitude of California, Clyde and Harriet lived with their daughter, Rowena, before returning to Prescott. Harriet lovingly cared for Clyde for the next four years of his physical and mental deterioration until his death in 1952.

Harriet spent her remaining years living part time in California with her daughter and part time in Prescott. She was a resident of the Arizona Pioneers' Home when she died in 1958.

Harriet was buried in Mountain View Cemetery beside her husband.

Donor: Hazel Clark Deming


Additional documentation and photographs may be available in the Sharlot Hall Museum Archives and Library.